Chunos, in Babette Audant’s Culinary Improvisation Course

Chuños were a failed experiment, but a worthwhile failure. These air-dried potatoes, a Peruvian staple, cannot be prepared in a freezer, at least not in one week. This was the assignment:

Week 7 – Foods in History/Food as History – you will be learning about foods/processing techniques that changed the course of history. We will discuss the role of historical foods such as quinine (which you will taste) in class. Later, Michael Krondl will be speaking about working with historical recipes.

You will also be sent home with a potato in a Ziploc bag. Yup, you read that correctly. You will take the potato home, freeze it overnight, defrost it during the day, re-freeze at night. Repeat all week and bring the results to class on November 6th. The links below will help explain what you are trying to do…this is one historical technique that may not have a role in the modern world.

Please document the process by taking a photo each day and posting the results online at the end of the week, or day by day, and label the photos as Day1, Day2, etc.

Read a short article about chuños

View a video about chuños

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About meganelias

I am a cultural historian who writes about American food. I am the author of Food on the Page: Cookbooks and American Culture (Penn Press, 2017), Stir it Up: Home Economics in American Culture,(Penn Press, 2008), Lunch: The History of a Meal (Rowman & LIttlefield, 2014) and "Food in the United States, 1890-1945," (Greenwood Press, 2009). My favorite food is toast.
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